Foreign Language Honor Societies learn traditional folk dances

Aaron Toland | Staff Writer

Last Thursday, members of several foreign language clubs learned folk dances in the Media Center. Members of Spanish National Honor Society, French National Honor Society, French Club and German Club were all present.

Former eighth grade science teacher Mrs. Fohey instructed students in a variety of traditional dances from different countries. Fohey taught students the national dance of Venezuela, a fisherman’s dance from Japan and dances from Ireland, Jamaica, Bolivia and France.

Students went to the event for a variety of reasons.

“I went because it sounded like fun and the French teacher said we would have a good time,” said French National Honor Society and French Club member Kyleigh Miklos. Of all the dances, her favorite dance was a French dance in which students got into groups of three.

Freshman and French Club member Natalie Bender attended to spend time with friends. “ I went because I have some friends in foreign language classes, and I thought it’d be something fun to try,” said Bender. “The best part was everyone just working together and laughing at our mistakes doing the dancing and just having fun as a group.”

No matter what a student’s reason, the activity provided foreign language students the opportunity to broaden their cultural experiences while having fun.

 

 

AP Government becomes year-long class

Izzy Burks | Staff Writer

AP Government has always been a one-semester course, but next year it is changing to a year-long class. Due to its crammed, fast-paced schedule, teacher Cale Hoover and social studies department head Cindy Cullom decided to stretch it out.

“We’ve been discussing this for a few years because College Board has always recommended AP Government be a full year,” Hoover said. “The social studies classes have been going through redesigns, and in November, I went to an AP conference at Butler and started learning about how things had changed. That was kind of this fighting factor I needed to convince myself that I needed to come back and work to get this changed.”

Because of this change, the class’s schedule will be at a slower pace, giving students longer to learn and retain each lesson.

“In the past, we covered 17 chapters,” Hoover said. “The concern is that we were basically teaching the material in 13 or 14 weeks because in the last few weeks of school they’re taking the AP test. This gives us the chance to take a deeper look into things now; I think it will be a better course for the kids.”

Along with the slower pace, there will also be other changes, including a few standards that have been altered.

“The college board made the requirements more specific,” Hoover said. “Just as one example, we are now required to teach 10 specific primary sources, and in the past, I only taught about half of them. Some of them are really challenging, so it’s good that we get extra time. There are more requirements that are more specific, too. The other major change is that in the past, there were four FRQs on the AP test, all formatted the same. Now there are four different types of writing that we have to teach.”

Juniors who planned on taking AP Government for one semester now have to plan on it being all year. Hoover feels that the class being year round will attract more juniors because the pace will be less intimidating.

“I thought it was frustrating because now I have to adjust my schedule accordingly, but it’s also nice because the information will be delivered at a slower pace,” junior Athulya Nair said. “I was still determined to take the class, but I know of other people who chose to take the one-semester non-AP class instead because of it.”

Some juniors have chosen to drop the class, but many see it in a positive way.

“I think the class will definitely be less stressful since the material is more spread out,” Nair said. “We will probably be able to focus more on important topics which will be good.”

AP Government becoming year-long means more time to learn and a deeper focus, and it may show in the number of next year’s seniors who take the class.

Best Buddies hosts first ever shootout during boys basketball halftime

McKenna Bryant | Staff Writer

During halftime of the boys varsity basketball game against Lawrence North last Friday, Best Buddies had the opportunity to have a shootout of their own.screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.55.50 am

“We were trying to come up with something different for our January out of school event, and we always try to make sure our buddies participate in a typical high school event,” senior Molly Surface said.

The members of Best Buddies approached Coach Zach Hahn with the idea and worked with Hahn and other Center Grove Basketball regulars to figure out when they could hold the event and recognize the buddies.

“I think it’s important because the more people who volunteer and play with the kids, then the more the kids will play basketball and have fun,” senior Lexie Hoskins said. “They don’t want to do it if no one comes, and I know they have a better time with more people around and encouraging them.”screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.55.57 am

The event showcased a competition between two different teams to see who could make more free throws in three minutes. Club members wanted to be prepared, so they practiced their shooting skills twice last week during STaR.

The club’s goal was to help the buddies get involved with the school and bring more awareness to their group.

“I believed we accomplished some quality basketball, some quality fun, and some quality inclusion,” Teacher Adam Gaff said.

Red Alert Robotics team plans for upcoming season

Kelsey Osborne | Staff Writer

Challenge. Accepted.

This is the motto of the Red Alert Robotics team. Every year the team builds a different robot to compete in a game that has specific tasks to complete.

The game for this year is called Destination: Deep Space. As with every game, it poses a series of challenges that the team will have to overcome in order to compete well and win events.

“[The game] is essentially six rocket ships on the field, and there are spots to put cargo and hatches onto the ships. At the end of the game there’s a habitat platform that you have to climb onto,” junior design captain Chase Rivas said. “That’s going to be the biggest challenge is getting onto the platform, the biggest one is going to be a foot and ten inches off the ground so we have to find a way to get the robot onto it.”

With competition season fast approaching, the team is quickly beginning to build their robot. The team will have six weeks to design, program and build the robot.

“At the end of the six weeks, we have to literally put the robot in a bag, and we can’t touch it until we get to our first competition,” senior team captain Veronica Strange said.

Because of the limited timeframe, the robotics team breaks into smaller teams in order to divide the work and work more efficiently.

“We have four sub-teams that are each responsible for a part of the robot and they coordinate with each other to create the whole thing,” junior shop manager Josh Stevenson said. “Then we CAD them so we can machine the robot well, and then we build a replica of the field that we can use to test our robot on.”

Strange works with the other captains in order to make sure the robot gets completed. During the first couple of weeks, her main focus is helping Rivas make sure the design of the robot will be effective and efficient.

“Our biggest thing that we focus on during the build season is designing the robot in our program system, CAD, and working with the rest of the team to design and come up with the best ways to build the robot and make it complete the challenge,” Rivas said.

Even though building the robot is the biggest concern during build season, Red Alert’s media team is also hard at work.

“I am in charge of making the t-shirt’s and designing them, and we make buttons and sticker and stamps to give out at competitions, which we do during build season,” senior media captain Gabby Scifres said. “We also have a YouTube channel and upload a segment of Red Alert on air each week to give updates on the build season. We have a website that is called redalert1741.org along with many social media accounts on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.”

Center Grove will be hosting their first robotics competition on March 29-30 in the Vandermeer Gymnasium. The competition is free and open to everyone.

Visual Communications students design and create custom shirts

Brenna Emerson and Sophia Freeland | Staff Writers

Visual communications is an art class offered to students that teaches them the basics of creating digital artwork. As the second semester starts, students have been creating their own t-shirts.

Some of the projects students have completed include stickers, album covers, business cards and digital illustrations. The t-shirt project is one of the later projects in the year for the students.

“By this time students have an understanding of how to make different types of art digitally using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator,” Visual Communications teacher Kadi Miller said.

Making these custom t-shirts is an opportunity for students to be even more creative compared to previous projects.   

“For the t-shirts, it’s kind of a more open project where they get to pick the process they use to design a t-shirt that describes something about who they are,” Miller said.

Every student’s shirt is unique to themselves.  Junior Alyssa Terrell’s inspiration for her shirt comes from her passion for the outdoors.

“My design is a puzzle of nature. There are pieces missing with a quote in the empty spaces. The puzzle pieces are incorporated because I love puzzles,” Terrell said.

Not only do the students get to design and create their own custom t-shirt, but they also do a photoshoot in the shirts.

“With the photos we take, we do digital magazine covers and magazine layouts so they learn about that process as well throughout the project,” Miller said.

By completing this project students show off skills they’ve been learning in a creative way.

Free events to visit on MLK day with the donation of canned goods

Tori Sykes and Dylan Godsave | Website Editors

On Monday, Jan. 21, students have the day off of school in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. day.

Many Indianapolis museums will be offering free events or admission with the donation of a canned good. If you’re looking for something to do on the day off, consider visiting one of these locations:

  1. The Indianapolis Museum of Art will be closed on Martin Luther King Jr. Day but will be offering free admission today  from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  2. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis has an exhibit dedicated to MLK and will include a performance by The Griot Drum Ensemble on Monday. Their hours of operation are from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  3. The NCAA Hall of Champions, open from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., will allow free entry with canned food donations on Monday. All exhibits will be open including a screening of The Game of Change, interactive sports simulators, and trivia challenges to name a few. Indianapolis Indians’ players and the mascot Rowdie will be on site from 11 a.m. until noon to visit with attendees.
  4. From 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Conner Prairie is hosting free theater performances to honor MLK, along with their traditional activities such as candle making, Discovery Station, Tree of Dreams and more.
  5. While the Indianapolis Zoo is typically closed on Mondays in January, they are open this Monday in honor of MLK. All indoor activities, the dolphin show and some outdoor exhibits will be open from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  6. The Indiana State Museum also offers free admittance to whoever brings canned goods to donate to Gleaners Food Bank. In addition, the IMAX within the museum is hosting a free screening of the movie “Selma” at 7 p.m.